Sriracha Glaze {Vegan}


I really do love me some Sriracha. One of my favorite co-workers and I used to go out for ramen and I would joke that I'm basically eating Sriracha with a side of ramen. Same with my pho, I know it's not authentic but it's basically sriracha broth and noodles.

Usually, I just drown my foods in just Sriracha from the bottle, but I thought I'd get a bit fancier this time and make a glaze.

Boy, was I right. I basically have 1) had this right out the jar and 2) have already put this on: Cauliflower gnocchi (but I'd eat those slathered in anything), Salmon, Chicken, Tofu (recipe coming!), plain cauliflower, steamed green beans... dare I say more?

Recipe:

1/4 c. Sriracha

2 tbs. Honey

1/2 tbs. Sugar

1/2 c. Soy sauce (or coconut aminos)

1/2 tbs. red pepper chili flakes (optional, only if you like it real spicy!)

3 tbs. corn starch

3 tbs. cold water

Yields ~ 1 cup of glaze

Directions:

Pour the sriracha, honey, sugar, soy sauce, and red chili flakes (if using) into a small sauce pan. Whisk together well over medium-high heat. When sauce starts boiling, reduce heat to low. In a separate bowl, whisk together the equal parts of corn starch and cold water. When the corn starch slurry is whisked (no lumps), add to the sauce. Whisk quickly to prevent any lumps, the sauce will quickly thicken and you'll have to remove it from the heat.

Use right away, or it will "gel" due to the corn starch. I packed mine in a mason jar with a tight fitting lid for use throughout the week.

#GlutenFree #Vegan #MealPrep #Dinner #Sauces

RECENT POSTS
SEARCH BY TAGS
ARCHIVE

All opinions on this blog reflect my own. Please do not borrow without asking, as I promise to do the same. The information in this blog is my own personal experience, research, knowledge, or nutrition expertise. I am a Registered Dietitian and Licensed in the state of Massachusetts, however, none of the information on this blog is a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. The information on this website has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure any disease. If you have any concerns or questions about your health, you should consult with a physician or other health-care professional.